Tag Archives: social media analytics

Join Web Analytics Anonymous

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However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results

– Winston Churchill

Web analytics for people, like me, are addictive. I’ll watch stats pileup in real-time, and get a tiny adrenaline rush everytime there’s an uptick. Judging by the puzzled looks , not everyone shares my enthusiasm. They should. Numbers of Twitter and Pinterest followers, bounce rates on web pages, and click-thrus on emails show real-world progress, or lack of it. And, with a little imagination, they can be turned into meaningful action. Marketing directors, planners and creatives who aren’t tapping into analytics are selling themselves and their brands short. This is why I’m high on analytics:

1. Hedonism. There are few things more pleasurable than seeing evidence that people are interacting with, and appreciating your work. If that doesn’t jazz you, check for a pulse, and dial up Monster.com

Web traffic grows in response to a higher blogging frequency

A more active blogging schedule increased web traffic 60%. I say we keep funding that!

2. Politics. How do you justify your budget?  On what basis do you ask for a contract renewal? What’s working that justifies a larger investment? Smartly presented analytics can tell the story, and give you the ammo to kill floundering programs.

3. Incremental improvement. A split test on email can tell you which content, design or subject line will drive the most click-thrus. Add that information to the next piece of creative you produce, and the results will continue.

For example, by switching from a text link to a green button, the click-thru rate on this email campaign jumped 117%.

Changing text links to buttons increases email click thrus.

4. Spot trends and opportunities. Amalgamate data from multiple sources, e.g. social media, web analytics, and email, to spot larger trends. When and where is your target audience most engaged? When and what do they want to buy? And what referral sources, like social media, web banners or search ads are most cost-efficient?

5. Fresh ideas. Unless you’re a quant, you probably think numbers are nerdy. But, by understanding the problems and opportunities that analytics reveal, you’ll develop insights that lead to innovation and lasting change.

6. Bragging. My favorite part when things go well. The website below grew from 1,200 monthly visits  to over 6,000 (blue line) post redesign. Web analytics enabled us to match the site’s potential to the needs of our client’s customers. Yep, there was a lot of fist pumping and beer after that one.

Web traffic increases after site redesign

You don’t need a degree in statistics to understand the most important web metrics used to evaluate websites. You just need to identify the handful that matter the most for your business. Start with the metrics that measure your key marketing objectives. Go from there, and soon I’ll see you at the Tuesday night meeting.

 

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Think Social Media is Free? Think Again.

The entry-level tools and platforms for social media are there just for the taking. But that’s like saying anyone who can get their hands on a kitchen knife can perform open-heart surgery. While the tools are freebies, the thinking, content, organization and strategy that go into them are not. This is true whether you are launching your own program internally, or partnering with Ideopia.

Before you take an accounting of the true costs of social media, consider what expectations you have of a program. Is it just to get your feet wet? Are you counting on it for customer service? Do you expect to drive traffic to your website? Calibrate your budget accordingly.

Strategic Leadership (Monthly)
What are the goals of your program? What are the metrics? How will it be managed? Who is your target audience? How will you grow or engage your audience?

Tactical (Daily)
Who will create content? How often? What are the rules for acceptable posts and Tweets? How will you achieve economies of scale by deploying the same content across multiple platforms?

Monitoring (Daily)
How will you monitor and respond to interactions on social media? Friend requests?

Analytics (Daily – Monthly)
What are you measuring? How frequently? Will you analyze response to content, e.g. a LinkedIn Group? How will analytics affect decision-making and content?

The software for social media may be free, but the meatware is not. Effective social media programs require investment, brains and tenacity.

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