June 2014

Rodents

Ideopia Honors Squirrel Savior

Rodents

Ideopia Honors Squirrel Savior

According to the Huffington Post, Intrepid pool man Rick Gruber saved a drowning squirrel by performing CPR. Über humanitarian Gruber said he would gladly perform CPR on any animal, including a rodent. Which makes Gruber's hometown, Phoenix, AZ, an awesome place to go code blue. The hour-long rescue video details the odyssey.

We'd like to thank Ideopia's Dano the Squirrel, and our Alexandria, VA, editor at large, Andrea Grenadier, for bringing this heart-warming tale to our attention.

Ideopia is intensely interested in squirrels. We don't really know why, but if you have interesting squirrel photos, please send them to us, and we'll share on Facebook.

Toni Parker joins Cincinnati, OH, ad agency

Propaganda

Brand Group Expands with Toni Parker

Propaganda

Brand Group Expands with Toni Parker

Thanks to Toni Parker, our account managers and planners are smiling even more these days. Toni has joined Ideopia in a new position as brand group support manager. She's assisting our brand planning group with research, account support, and quality assurance. Her past positions have included Senior Quality Assurance Specialist at Burke, Inc., Project Manager at Convergys, and Director of Project Management at Triumph Signs and Consulting.

Social Media

The Social Media Tradeshow: Now We're Talking.

Social Media

The Social Media Tradeshow: Now We're Talking.

Social media is the most helpful tool for getting the most out of your trade show since Dr. Scholl's inserts.

With a teensy weensy bit of planning, you can prime the pump for sales before the event, drive prospects to your booth during the event, and make them feel sad afterwards that they didn't buy when you were feeling generous. Ahh, we do exaggerate sometimes.

Two Weeks Before the Show

Recruit your team. You'll need everyone from sales reps to the CEO to send you photos, Vines, and quick tidbits, like "Whoops, Dee Taylor just got sucked into the high pressure machine. We need one more customer!"

We are going to have some serious fun!

Start bleating about new products and services at the show. You'll want to promote special guests, stroke your distribution network, acknowledge visits to your booth, and share tips about local eateries and bars.

Post informal videos that feature your people and why they're so pumped about their products. Show specific features, and, in this case, feel free to wing it with your SmartPhone.

The Big Day

  1. Make sure your social media schedule is in sync with the local time zone of the show.
  2. Use show hashtags on all your posts. Attendees will click on these to review all the posts from the show.
  3. Push demos of products and the pain points they solve, and the expertise of the people offering them. Not sales and discounts. Hard sell is just not cool on social media.
  4. Go live. Prepackaged content is fine, but this is an event. Be relevant and timely. Post photos of visitors, interactions with your product, and don't forget to snap the scrumptious Chicken Kiev at the keynote luncheon.
  5. Post early and late. People aren't on their normal schedules. Imagine what they're doing, eating breakfast, breaking for lunch, becoming exhausted after a lengthy seminar. Keep your audience's place and time in mind when crafting your Tweets. "Thanks to everyone who came to our open house." "If you enjoyed it a little too much, stop by booth #451 for the analgesic of your choice."
  6. Make friends by retweeting posts from non-competing companies, and they'll return the favor.
  7. Increase frequency: you want your tradeshow social media to sound like a play by play. Make it entertaining and the rest of your followers or friends will give you a pass on the extra content. Pick peak times, and let them rip at least two times an hour.

The Morning After

  1. Acknowledge the people who made your show such a success.
  2. Post photos to Instagram or Facebook.
  3. Follow up on products and topics that attendees were interested in.
  4. Remind people about contacts. "Golden raisins were a big hit. Steve's our raisin guy, so contact him for more info."

Get your team together and toss back some celebratory suds. You did a great job.

Marketing

Show Us the Money. The Joys of Agency/Client Transparency.

Marketing

Show Us the Money. The Joys of Agency/Client Transparency.

If you're gun shy about disclosing your marketing budget, join the crowd. Maybe you were traumatized by a used car salesman at a tender age, or got a hose job from an unscrupulous ad agency, and you've learned to hold the money cards.

We would kindly suggest, get over it. It's hurting your ability to get the best from your agency, and lack of transparency on either side of the agency/client relationship erodes trust. And, if you don't' trust your agency, why are you working with them?

Bereft of a budget, agencies will punt with an array of strategies, and none work to your advantage:

  • Guess based on marketing allocations within your industry, and inquiries to publishers and media outlets to determine what you spent in the past.
  • Over plan for a budget you don't have, which wastes your time and the agency's.
  • Go low, cut corners, and pile on features by using junior people to execute your work.
  • And the good agencies, the one's you most want on your work, will simply choose not to play.

In other words, you're inviting agencies to take a trip to Walmart with your very important project.

Instead of telling an agency to plop out a number for, say, a website. Ask which of your important goals can they achieve within your budget. Find out how they plan to allocate your budget and what they will deliver. If you're running a review, or a competition for a prime project, leveling the field is the only way you can realistically compare agencies – at least on a financial basis.

Laying your budget on the line may seem counterintuitive. After all, if we know what's in your piggy bank, won't we spend it all? Darn tooting! You told us the important objectives you want to achieve. And you determined that if you invested "x" amount in marketing, the ROI would make it worth it. So why not cough up the numbers?

All this takes valuable time and energy, which should be applied to determining strategy and the most effective way to allocate the budget you do have.

Reap the Rewards of Transparency

  1. Tell your agency your marketing objectives strategy and budget. And focus your agency team on developing the most effective way to spend it.
  2. Evaluate agencies based on what they can do for your money, not how much they spend.
  3. Create an atmosphere of transparency and trust from the start. Agencies will respond with extra attention and work to live up to their part of the bargain.

Commandments

The Five Commandments of Beer Marketing and Thought Leadership

Commandments

The Five Commandments of Beer Marketing and Thought Leadership

We've made no secret that Ideopia is on the warpath to nab a brewery client. So it occurred to us that we should heed the same advice we give our clients and become thought leaders. The best way to become a thought leader is to ponder your topic, pound down some suds, and write about it. So this is what we came up with. It works for investment bankers, florists, and snack food, too.

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