November 15, 2014

Tree conservation by Cincinnati ad agency

Tree Hugging

Treebies: Sprouting Up in Your Mailbox

Tree Hugging

Treebies: Sprouting Up in Your Mailbox

Are you an Ideopia client? If so, keep an eye on your mailbox for a Treebie card from your eco pals at Ideopia.

So, what’s a Treebie? After every major print job, we plant a tree to restore what we borrowed from the environment. It’s our way of making things right with Mother Nature, and spreading a little good to our business partners.

As for the cards, they’re FSC® certified, which means made with 100% post consumer fiber, earth-friendly toner instead of ink, no new trees, and processed chlorine free.

Dig into the Details on Our Treebie Landing Page

To learn more, check out our new Treebie landing page. It’s loaded with factoids about the program, and a cool infographic that highlights the impact on the environment. For example, did you know a single replanted tree can provide roughly 20,000 sheets of paper and enough oxygen for two people?

Ready for your very own Treebie? Call Susan at 513-947-1444 x10, and put in an order for a new print job.

Special credit to designer Emily Babel and copywriter Eric House who grew the Treebie idea.

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Self promotion for Cincinnati advertising agency

Propaganda

Ideopia Comes Out as a Hybrid Animal

Propaganda

Ideopia Comes Out as a Hybrid Animal

Poke around Ideopia social media, and you’ll see these bizarre hybrid animals brought to life by designer Curtis Gable. Hybrid is the way Ideopia puts together ad campaigns from wildly different media, like billboards, social media and web development, and weaves them into campaigns that pack a wallop.

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Holiday social media tips

Social Media

Holiday Social Media: Don’t Blow It.

Social Media

Holiday Social Media: Don’t Blow It.

By Tori Tarvin, Social Media Marketing Manager

Brands often fall flat with their holiday social media execution. It takes sensitivity and common sense to balance content, appropriate frequency and sales plugs.

For a winning social strategy over the next few months, follow these do’s and don’ts. And tweet us your own social media holiday wins @Ideopia.

Don’t clutter your feeds with pushy sales messages.

Unless you’re a retailer with major discounts on Black Friday, cut the pushy sales copy from your queue. It’s not the time or place to interrupt your audience’s online experience.

Instead, share content that pairs well with the holiday. Post a branded card or try helpful and entertaining content, like cold-weather family activities or recipes. Your audience will appreciate the effort, and you’ll appreciate the increased loyalty and engagement.

Don’t over do it.

Consider your brand’s social media goals and business objectives. Do these align with a specific holiday message? Desperate social media tie-ins have #fail written all over them. Like the Golf Channel’s shameless plug on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Piggybacking off a historic day and making it about golf was obnoxious. Tactics like these may get your brand viral, but not in the way you want!

Instead, consider your brand voice in typical social media content. Create copy that encompasses that personality and remains appropriate for your audience. If your post doesn’t naturally connect with the holiday, don’t stretch to make it fit.

Social media habits change during the holidays.

Your audience likely engages with social media differently over the holidays compared to work mode. Instead of sourcing Twitter for industry news and +1’ing content for increased reach, your audience is online for entertainment and recreation.

Don’t share the same "work mode" content for your B2B audience. Get creative and lower the frequency. Humanize your brand with fun, relatable and visual content like Lowe’s hardware fireworks display on Vine.

Interested in more social media marketing tips? Click here or give us a call at 513-947-1444 x10.

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The dangers of secondary market research

The Numbers

Is Your Company Average?

The Numbers

Is Your Company Average?

We noticed something weird this week. Much of the secondary data, like the social media usage chart above, is based on averaging a group of more or less unrelated data points. See chart above. What’s an average B2B company? We doubt that it’s yours. That’s why it’s crucial to develop your own qualitative and quantitative data.

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