February 15, 2015

Media Happenings

Are Customers Streaming By Your Brand?

Media Happenings

Are Customers Streaming By Your Brand?

Music streaming services, like Pandora, Spotify and YouTube, are nightmares for the music industry. But for marketers, they’re a burgeoning advertising opportunity, because streamers love their brands.

They’re also the reason consumers are growing more elusive on television, land-based radio, and print. Forty percent of streamers, for example, are listening to their favorite tunes on smartphones. Last year in the United States, they downloaded more than 280 billion songs.

A study by Spotify and administered by comScore provides a snapshot of consumers and how they engage more with brands they encounter on streaming services. It’s fascinating:

People who use a streaming music service at least once monthly, are:

2x as likely to pay more for brands

61% more likely to recommend brands to a friend

74% more likely to describe a brand as “the only brand for me”

70% more likely to describe a brand as fun and playful

2x more likely to feel emotionally involved and advocate for a brand

Yes, it made us feel verklimpt, too.

This billion dollar worldwide industry is here to stay. Since the first hand-cranked DVR and now with consumers switching between multiple platforms and devices, it’s only intensifying.

So as we always advise, go where the freaking food is.

In the face of these unstoppable trends, marketers need to exploit this audience and embrace the creative possibilities. While the reach of streaming services is enormous, you can buy a small, targeted portion slice of the pie by narrowing your audience with demographics, geotargeting and other demographics. We encourage you to jump in the water and start experimenting!

Streamers are twice as likely as non-streamers to advocate for and feel emotionally connected to brands.

For a comparison of top U.S. music services see Mashable’s piece on Pandora, Spotify, iHeart Radio and Slacker.

For a more comprehensive overview of services worldwide, see this Wikipedia article.

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Radio Made Good

10 Hacks for Your Next Radio Commercial

Radio Made Good

10 Hacks for Your Next Radio Commercial

Radio, on and offline, is still a great media value for reaching target demographic groups and building frequency. And online radio, which reaches an estimated 47% of all Americans, is fueling the flames. To help you get the most out of your next campaign, we compiled a list of our favorite radio and audio hacks:

  1. Never forget that radio is a visual medium. People hear words and see an HD movie in their head. If you can imagine it – a three-headed talking goat, for example – you can create it in the mind’s eye of your audience.
  2. Not everyone has a Bose sound system in their car, so it’s crucial to experience how the 99 percenters will hear your spot. Most studios can simulate small speakers.
  3. Read the spot out loud several times before heading to the studio. If a phrase is difficult for you to pronounce, or the syntax is awkward, it will hang up the talent, too.
  4. Choose talent that doesn’t work regularly in your targeted markets. They will help your spot pop. Get the best talent you can afford, and don’t automatically accept what the studio or radio station has to offer. Otherwise, be contrarian in your selection. If your competitors sound like the local radio announcers, use an ethnic voice. If they tap male announcer types, hire a female actor who can make a casual delivery.
  5. Most spots that aren’t for auctioneer services should be written short. While 130 words for a 60-second spot is fairly common, we prefer 110 to 120. Why? That’s a normal speaking tempo for a homosapian, and it gives the producer room to place sound effects most effectively.
  6. Silence is your secret weapon. Use it before an important copy point, like a phone number, that you want the audience to remember.
  7. Don’t use talent with a real or fake British accent ever. Never. Just don’t do it. Hungarian. Okay. Texas redneck. Okay. Just not British.
  8. Make spots that are compatible with the formats and stations you’ve selected. This doesn’t mean you need a country music bed for a spot running on a country station. But you shouldn’t use fake or real British accents that scream, “We don’t get you!”
  9. You are speaking to one person who’s driving, listening through ear buds, or engaged in work. DO NOT YELL AT PEOPLE. The whole point of radio is to have a real conversation one on one.
  10. Music. Most advertisers use an obligatory music bed, but unless the tune reinforces the spot’s message, it’s just noise. Produce your spot dry and grab more attention.

Radio is a blast online and off. You may not have a TV budget for a base-jumping mariachi band, but you can sure do it on radio.

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Viral Video

Obama Woos Millennials with Selfies

Viral Video

Obama Woos Millennials with Selfies

Millennials might hate healthcare.gov, but they love watching President Obama snap a selfie. As of Feb. 23, the Commander-in-Chief’s BuzzFeed video, “Things Everyone Does But Doesn’t Talk About,” had been watched more than 50 million times.

By acting like a millennial and even poking fun at himself – blaming Obama when his cookie won’t fit in a glass of milk – the President hopes to encourage the fickle (and crucial) 18-29 demographic to sign up for healthcare coverage.

As for whether the two-minute video will help convert millennials into Obamacare customers? We’ll see after the deadline passes.

If you’re thinking, “Ideopia, I can’t get Obama to make my brand’s content go viral,” you’re probably right. But, we can offer you tips on creating compelling content that your customers and prospects crave, from YouTube videos to blog posts and social media.

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